Tag Archives: publishing

GirlChild Press accepting manuscript submissions

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Although we have set the publishing slate for 2010 with the anticipated release of Woman’s Work: The Short Stories (the final anthology from the girls series) and our first single-author book, A Little Truth on Your Shirt, by Sonya Renee Taylor, we are already preparing for 2011.

In line with the GirlChild Press mission, we are interested in publishing the works of women and girl writers. We are especially interested in submissions from writers 21-years-old and younger, although writers of all ages are invited to submit their work.

We are currently looking for manuscripts in the following areas:

* YA Novels(with special interest in a Native American/Latina/Arab/Asian protagonist)

* Speculative Fiction

* Historical Fiction

* Poetry

* Memoirs

* How to (with an emphasis on girls)

No exclusively erotica manuscripts at this time. Also no anthologies.

Submission Guidelines:

1. Submit the first ten (10) pages of your manuscript electronically to girlchildpress@aol.com.

2. The subject line of the email should include the title of the work, your name and the genre. Example: Black Swan submitted by Michelle Sewell – memoir.

3. A basic summary of the work should be included in the body of the email, along with your bio.

4. Also share why you believe this book should be published and who is the intended audience.

5. Please allow 3-4 weeks for reveiw. If we are interested in seeing the entire manuscript we will contact you for a hard copy.

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Leapfrog 2010 Fiction Book Contest

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Deadline May 1; each category winner gets book contract and advance; some cash prizes too; entry fees:

$30 adult literary fiction (novellas, lit novels, short story collections) – minimum of 22,000 words

$20 children’s fiction (YA and middle-grade novels) – min. 20,000 words

Entry and info HERE: www.leapfrogpress.com

Publisher accepting nonfiction book proposals

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Crown Publishing’s Ten Speed Press

Book subjects: cooking, how-to, crafts, gardening, relationships, how-to, gift, humor and pop culture, business

Guidelines to submit HERE:

http://tenspeed.crownpublishing.com/book-proposal-submissions/

Author interview with…Wendy Burt-Thomas

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Hi all! I’m flying to NY for 8 days so I’m taking some liberties and running my own author interview. I’ll be back with new authors and writing contests around July 22.

Author interview with Wendy Burt-ThomasQueryBook copy

Wendy Burt-Thomas is a full-time freelance writer, editor and PR consultant. She works from her home office in Colorado Springs – usually in pajamas or sweatpants. Wendy has written three books, and her fourth book comes out in April 2010. Her first two books, written with Erin Kindberg, were, “Oh, Solo Mia! The Hip Chick’s Guide to Fun for One” (2001, McGraw-Hill) and “Work It, Girl! 101 Tips for the Hip Working Chick” (2003, McGraw-Hill).

  1. 1.    Tell us about your latest book.

“The Writer’s Digest Guide to Query Letters” is a how-to book about getting published. It includes information on writing a query letter for magazines, agents, novels and nonfiction books.

The book was a great fit for me because I’d been teaching “Breaking Into Freelance Writing” for about eight years. In the workshop, I covered a lot of what is in this book: writing query letters to get articles in magazines, to land an agent, or to get a book deal with a publisher. Since I’m a full-time freelance magazine writer and editor with two previous books, this was incredibly fun to write because it didn’t require tons of research. I was lucky enough to receive lots of great sample query letters from writers and authors that I use as “good” examples in the book. I wrote all the “bad” examples myself because I didn’t dare ask for contributions that I knew I’d be ripping apart!

In addition to the ins and outs of what makes a good query, the book covers things like why (or why not) to get an agent, where to find one and how to choose one; writing a synopsis or proposal; selling different rights to your work; other forms of correspondence; and what editors and agents look for in new writers.

It was really important to me that the book not be a dry, boring reference book, but rather an entertaining read (while still being chock full of information). I was thrilled that Writer’s Digest let me keep all the humor.

2. How did you get started as a writer?

I’ve also been a writer. My dad is a writer (12 books, probably thousands of other published pieces) and I gave him a short story for his birthday one year (I think I was 7) and he read it aloud in church. I was hooked! My first paid piece was a poem I wrote at age 16. My dad sent it to a magazine on my behalf (without telling me) and I got an acceptance and check in the mail. I thought, “Wow! People paid me for my words? This is cool.” Yes, writing CAN be about the money too!

3. What does a typical day look like for you?

Send my kids off to a nearby home daycare (soon to be preschool!) and then spend at least an hour going through emails. Then I’m either writing (articles, a book, greeting cards), editing or doing PR coaching on the phone. I try not to work after my kids get home, other than posting my latest author interview and writing contests on Facebook and Twitter every night. (Twitter.com/WendyBurt)

4. Describe your workspace.

I have a cream and wood L-shaped desk , bookshelf and two matching filing cabinets that I just love. My office is in a sort of loft area on the second floor of our house, but now that we built our sunroom, I look out onto a tile roof. It’s probably for the best so I don’t procrastinate by watching our neighbor. Besides, the view out the picture window behind me is of Pikes Peak!

I’m not a clean freak, but I’m a bit of an organizational freak. There is dust behind my computer, but everything is it’s a labeled file. I have four Macs and often have two going at once.

 

5. Favorite books (especially for writers)

“Lessons From a Lifetime of Writing” by David Morrell

“Bird by Bird” by Anne Lamott

“On Writing” by Stephen King

Two new books for writers:

• “Get Known Before the Book Deal” by Christina Katz  (http://www.getknownbeforethebookdeal.com/)

• “Writing the Life Poetic” (http://writingthelifepoetic.typepad.com/) by Sage Cohen

Also, my dad, “The Sinister Minister” is the author of 12 books. (www.BurtCreations.com)

6. Tell us 3 interesting/crazy things about you

– A horse bit off the last knuckle on my right middle finger when I was 5.

– I once owned a muffin business in Vermont called Little Miss Muffin.

– I went to the University of Aberdeen (in Scotland) my junior year of college.

7. Favorite quote

“Luck is when preparation meets opportunity.”

8. Best and worst part of being a writer

I love when I get to write humor and people email me to say that think I’m funny and that it made my book (like the query guide) fun to read, even though it’s an informational book. I’ve gotten more “fan mail” on this book than my first two combined and the emails make my day EVERY time.

I don’t like being at the mercy of my clients when it comes to deadlines because I have two little kids.

9. Advice for other writers

Seize every opportunity that comes along when you’re first starting off. Many of your regular writing gigs will be from repeat business and referrals.

10. Tell us a story about your writing experience.

I was on a flight to NY skimming my first book for errors and the woman next to me leaned over and said, “Is that any good?” I laughed and said, “It had better be. I wrote it.”

 

Where can people buy my book(s)?

You can buy my latest book, “The Writer’s Digest Guide to Query Letters” in most major bookstores (it’s usually right next to the Writers Market) or on Amazon.com.

Follow me on Twitter.com/WendyBurt or befriend me on Facebook or LinkedIn.

 

Want to get get published? I’m doing a radio show tomorrow

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I’m doing a radio show tomorrow – talking about query letters (getting an agent, book deal, magazine credits): (5pm mt/4pm pst)

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/ThePublishingInsiders/2009/04/28/The-Publishing-Insiders

10 QUESTIONS FOR…Jessica Tilles, award-winning author of African American “Romantica”

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Author interview withloving-simone_2-10-2009-copydsc_0015-flipped

Jessica Tilles, award-winning author of African American “Romantica” (romance + erotica)

A native of Washington, DC, JESSICA TILLES is the best-selling, award-winning author of Anything Goes, In My Sisters’ Corner, Apple Tree, Sweet Revenge, Fatal Desire, Unfinished Business and the anthology Erogenous Zone: A Sexual Voyage. As publisher of Xpress Yourself Publishing (www.xpressyourselfpublishing.org), she is the 2008 African American Literary Awards Show recipient of Independent Publisher of the Year award. She is also the founder of The Writer’s Assistant (www.thewritersassistant.com) and Erotic Expressions (www.eroticexpressions.net). Currently working on her next literary endeavor, she resides in Upper Marlboro, Maryland with her family.

1. Tell us about your latest book.

My newest novel is Loving Simone will be released March 13, 2009. The novel is a mixture of romance and erotica. I believe it’s a new genre that’s now called Romantica. From the outside, Simone (the main character) has the perfect life and family. However, the inside tells of a different story. After ten years of being the faithful, dutiful wife and mother, Simone desperately struggles with releasing the hidden desires of pleasure she cannot seem to get from her husband, causing her to turn to self-fulfillment and outside influences. Jackson, her hubby, is too busy focusing on the women who work for him, self-indulgence, and sticking his pole in every hole, rather than his wife. Darius is every woman’s dream and has had a crush on Simone since he was a teen. When their paths cross, all of Simone’s inhibitions are released and finally someone, other than Jackson, is Loving Simone.

This novel is definitely my best work and I’m looking forward to receiving the responses of my readership!

2. How did you get started as a writer?

I’d always been an avid reader, which is something I truly miss now. There never seems to be any time to relax and read someone’s work other than my own. After reading Homecourt Advantage by Rita Ewing and Crystal McCray Anthony, I decided to try my hand at writing a novel. At that time, I had no idea how easy it would be. I harbored a talent I knew nothing about until I sat behind my computer and typed the first chapter to Anything Goes. What a fantastic feeling it was to create a time, place and cast of characters based solely on my imagination.

3. What does a typical day look like for you?

A typical day for me is working on my publishing business and creating book cover and web site designs, as well as typesetting for my clients. I pretty much stay in my pajamas all day, unless I need to run errands to the post office or the bank, maybe the grocery store. I lead a boring life, and I love every minute of it! Usually around 11 p.m. is when I will focus on writing.

4. Describe your desk/workspace.

Unorganized. However, surprisingly, I know where everything is!

5. Favorite books (especially for writers)

There are several references I refer to on a regular basis, but the top five books I use are:

1.  The Flip Dictionary by Barbara Ann Kipfer, Ph.D.

2.  The Chicago Manual of Style (15th Edition)

3.  Random House Writer’s Reference

4.  The Writer’s Guide to Character Traits

6. Tell us 3 interesting/crazy things about you

1.  I love Doritos and Pepsi on a Saturday night, with a good movie.

2. I’m afraid of speaking in front of a large group.

3.  After 42 years, I still suck my thumb when I can’t get to sleep.

7. Favorite quote

“Never allow anyone to become your priority while you become their option.”

8. Best and worst part of being a writer

I’ve yet to experience anything too bad about being a writer. As with anything else, I take the negativity with a grain of salt and keep it moving. The best part of being a writer is being able to touch people with my novels. It’s a good feeling when a reader sends me an emailing telling me how much they were moved by my words.

9. Advice for other writers

Research the business of publishing. Continue to hone your writing skills. Learn from the mistakes of others.

Where can people buy your books?

All of my titles are available at Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com, Borders.com, and other online retailers, as well as in bookstores everywhere. To learn more about my novels, and me, you may visit www.JessicaTilles.com. To learn more about Xpress Yourself Publishing and its authors, please visit www.XpressYourselfPublishing.org. Also visit www.TheWritersAssistant.com to view samples of work I’ve done for other authors.

My friend’s son’s new book! (He’s only 7!)

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This should inspire you wannabe authors! My friend Carla helped produce her 7-year-old son’s book, “Butterflies Shouldn’t Wear Shoes” and it’s fabulous! I just got my copy in the mail and my kids love it. And he’s donating the proceeds to a wildlife fund. She’s already getting people requesting the book in Barnes and Noble and he’s been on TV several times!

 

Check out the web site: http://www.butterfliesshouldntwearshoes.com

 

Too cute and for a good cause! Go Erik!