Tag Archives: series

10 QUESTIONS FOR…Marilyn Meredith -writes a mystery series & crime series!

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Author interview with Marilyn Meredithmarilynmeredith(2)DispelTheMistBusinessCard855x55

I’m the author of over 25 books, most of them mysteries. I write two series, the Deputy Tempe Crabtree mystery series and the Rocky Bluff P.D. crime series. I also do some ghost writing. I live in the foothills of the Central Coast in a town much like Bear Creek where my heroine, Tempe, lives. I belong to three chapters of Sisters in Crime and I’m on the board of the Public Safety Writers Association, and I also belong to Epic and MWA.

1. Tell us about your latest book.

In Dispel the Mist, Tempe investigates the murder of a popular county supervisor and has an encounter with the Hairy Man. The Hairy Man is similar to Big Foot, but he resides in the mountains above the Bear Creek Indian Reservation. The Hairy Man is really a Tule River Indian legend—but I borrowed him for this mystery.

2. How did you get started as a writer?

I’ve written since I was a kid. However, I didn’t get published until 1981. My first book was a historical family saga based on my own family’s genealogy.

After writing a second one based on the other side of the family, I began writing mysteries since that’s what I like most to read.

3. What does a typical day look like for you?

Usually I check my emails first—I shouldn’t, but I always want to see if there’s something important that I need to take care of. If I have a work-in-progress, that’s the next thing on my list. Right now I’m involved with promoting Dispel the Mist, so I’m doing things like making posters for my in-town personal appearances and promoting them and other physical appearances on the Internet. Because I’m doing a virtual book tour as well, I’m spending some time doing interviews like this. Actually, I enjoy them.

4. Describe your workspace.

I have a nice office with my desktop computer, two printers, two bookcases filled with books and supplies, a long table for piling things up that I’m planning to take this place or that. There is one window where I can look out at the foothills and the high mountains beyond.

5. Favorite books (especially for writers)

Before I was published it was always the Writers Market. I have a lot of writing books, but my favorite book is my thesaurus to help me find descriptive action verbs.  I also have several books about Native Americans and Indian legends. I refer to them sometimes to find good quotes for book titles.

6. Tell us 3 interesting/crazy things about you

My crazy days are long past. I’ve got a big family; we raised five children, now have eighteen grandchildren and eleven great grandkids.  I’ve been married to the same man for nearly 58 years and he’s still my best friend. We love to travel and have fun going to mystery conferences and conventions in new places we’ve never visited before.

7. Favorite quote

“I’m too blessed to be stressed.” And I live by that.

8. Best and worst part of being a writer

Best part about being a writer is letting my imagination go wild and seeing the people who live inside my mind live out their lives in the pages of the books I write. I love it when a reader tells me they loved a book of mine.  The worst part of being a writer is not having enough time to do all the things I’d like to do.

9. Advice for other writers

Never give up.  My first book was rejected nearly 30 times before it was finally accepted.  Don’t pay anyone in order to be published. If your book is good enough, you’ll find a publisher one day.  To be a writer you need to sit in front of your computer and write every day, or at least nearly every day.

10. Tell us a story about your writing experience. 

It’s a wonder I didn’t give up somewhere along the line. I’ve had two publishers die on me. I had two publishers who were crooks. One was actually put in jail and the other one took off never to be found, as far as I know. I had one publisher who never bothered to pay me my royalties even though I knew books were being bought. I’ve had two publishers who decided to quit the business. That’s why I say “never give up.” At the moment I have two very good—and honest—publishers.

Where can people buy your books?

Dispel the Mist can be purchased from the publisher http://www.mundaniapress.com as an e-book or trade paperback. It is also available from other bookstores.

You can read the first chapter of Dispel the Mist on my website: http://fictionforyou.com

My blog is http://marilynmeredith.blogspot.com

10 QUESTIONS FOR…mystery series author Elizabeth Zelvin

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Author interview with Elizabeth ZelvinLZheadshot FINAL150dpideathwillhelpyou

Elizabeth Zelvin is a New York City psychotherapist whose mystery series from Minotaur Books features recovering alcoholic Bruce Kohler. Death Will Get You Sober appeared in 2008. Library Journal called it “a remarkable and strongly recommended first novel.” Death Will Help You Leave Him is just out. One short story was nominated for an Agatha award; another appeared in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine; a third is included in the holiday crime anthology The Gift of Murder, to benefit Toys for Tots.

1. Tell us about your latest book.

Death Will Help You Leave Him is the second in my mystery series about recovering alcoholic Bruce Kohler and his friends, computer genius Jimmy and world-class codependent Barbara. It’s all about bad relationships: domestic violence and being hooked on someone who’s in some way unavailable. When a friend’s abusive boyfriend is murdered in her apartment, she becomes the prime suspect. Bruce has to juggle the investigation, his sobriety, a crush on the bereaved girlfriend, and the lure of his compelling but destructive ex-wife, who’s on a collision course of her own. The sleuthing takes him to a funeral in Brooklyn, an Italian bakery, a lingerie boutique on Madison Avenue, and an art gallery in SoHo. In the end, he has to make some hard choices. And of course he finds the murderer.deathwillgetyousober

2. How did you get started as a writer?

I’ve wanted to be a writer since the age of 7, when I read L.M. Montgomery’s Emily of New Moon. Like Montgomery’s more famous Anne of Green Gables, Emily was a little orphan girl on Prince Edward Island, but Emily had a burning desire to write and took a lot of flak about it. I worked in publishing back in the days when every woman had to start as a secretary, hoping it would help me get a novel published, but I ended up editing accounting textbooks. Then I started writing poetry. I dreamed of publishing the first novel at 24, but it didn’t happen. I didn’t get published till my late thirties, though I eventually published two books of poetry. I wrote three mysteries that were agented but didn’t sell in the Seventies. My first novel finally came out on my sixty-fourth birthday.

3. What does a typical day look like for you?

I usually spend my whole day at the computer, flipping back and forth between my professional work (more about that below), writing, and the huge amount of networking and promotion that goes with being a writer nowadays. I wish I could say that I start working on the current manuscript without opening my email first, but I can’t. I’ve recently joined Facebook, and it’s already brought me promotion opportunities and maybe some readers, but I keep an eye on the clock and don’t let myself get lost in it. At some point I go out and run for an hour—around the Central Park reservoir when I’m at home in the city, someplace beautiful, preferably near water, anywhere else.

4. Describe your workspace.

I have two: one in Manhattan and the other in my little house on eastern Long Island. I’m in that one right now, and it’s my laptop on a little computer table looking out at my garden and bird feeders. When I look up, I also see a sign that’s my mantra for the first draft: “Just Keep Telling the Story!” That’s to stop me from trying to edit or censor myself before I get to the end. Revision comes later. In the city, it’s a desktop computer and a lot bigger desk, and I have my back to the window. When I look up, I’m looking at a portrait of my mother that an admirer painted in her youth. Family legend claims that his wife was so jealous she insisted on being there during the sittings. My mother was a lawyer and a big role model for me. She died ten years ago at the age of 96. She would have been thrilled about my novels but baffled that I chose to write mysteries. I don’t have the luxury of a room with a door I can close in either place, but I get the alone time I need, and that works for me. I don’t understand people who write their novels in Starbucks.

5. Favorite books (especially for writers)

My very favorite book is Lois McMaster Bujold’s A Civil Campaign, which is part of the Miles Vorkosigan science fiction series. It’s a brilliant, laugh-out-loud funny cross between space opera and comedy of manners with some of the most memorable and lovable characters in fiction. The author I’ve discovered recently whose work I’ve enjoyed most is Ariana Franklin, who’s written Mistress of the Art of Death and two sequels about a 12th century woman pathologist in Henry II’s England. Again, it’s the endearing characters that get me every time.

6. Tell us 3 interesting/crazy things about you

1. I’m a shrink. I directed alcohol treatment programs and had a private practice in Manhattan for many years, but now, I do online therapy. I work with clients from all over the world by chat and email on my therapy website at LZcybershrink.com.

2. I’ve been to Timbuctoo. I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in West Africa in the Sixties and had a short but magical visit to this city that was a cultural and commercial center 500 years ago and now looks (or did when I was there) like a bunch of sandcastles in the desert.

3. I played Nashville this summer. At the mystery conference Killer Nashville back in August, the guest of honor, J.A. Jance, was given a gorgeous black guitar at the awards dinner. I borrowed it and sang “Long Black Veil,” which is probably the best paranormal murder ballad ever written.

7. Favorite quote

E.M. Forster’s tag for Howard’s End: “Only connect.” That’s what it’s all about for me, whether it’s as a writer, a therapist, a performer, or just a person: moving people to tears or laughter, listening—really listening—sharing myself and getting intimate glimpses of others.

8. Best and worst part of being a writer

The best part is those moments when the voice is coming through you from some mysterious place and all you have to do is write it down before it disappears. “The Muse,” or “inspiration” isn’t some abstract concept. Those are names writers in different eras have given to a very particular experience, when the words kind of tug at the inside of your head and you simply must get to pen and paper or a keyboard. For me, they have a maddening way of coming when I’m out running or in the shower. It’s a challenge to get them down when you’re, um, unclothed and dripping wet without frying the keyboard.

The worst part is the first draft—no contest. I’m an into-the-mist writer, not an outliner, and when I write the first draft, I’m driven by fear that I won’t be able to get to the end of the story. Sometimes it’s torture—the exact opposite of that “I am just a channel” state that’s the best part.

9. Advice for other writers

It takes talent, persistence, and luck to get published. To encourage the talent, you have to read, read, read and write, write, write. You can’t do anything about the luck except not quit five minutes before the miracle. Beyond that, it’s persistence, persistence, persistence. And get critique. Be willing to kill your darlings.

10. Tell us a story about your writing experience. Can be funny, embarrassing, inspirational, etc.  

I wrote the first draft of my first mystery years before I finished it in 2002. It wasn’t published till 2008, and by that time it had undergone a lot of revision. In fact, I rewrote the whole thing before St. Martin’s offered me a contract. But the first scene, when Bruce wakes up in detox on the Bowery on Christmas Day and realizes he needs to change his life, struck me as just right, so I didn’t tinker with it beyond taking out an adverb or two when I realized they’re frowned on by writing mavens who think they weaken one’s prose. A lot of people, including my legendary editor, her assistant, a copy editor, and a proofreader had seen the manuscript before it was finally set in type. When I got the galleys, I knew any changes at that point would be expensive, so it would be better not to make any, except to correct any typos. When I got to page 2, I was horrified to see that the patients in the detox were smoking in bed, and the nun didn’t say a word about it. That was okay when I wrote the scene—as it was when I first worked on the Bowery—but not in 2008. I changed it.

Death Will Help You Leave Him is available in “brick & mortar” mystery, independent, and chain bookstores as well as online bookstores starting October 13. For more information about Liz and her books, check out her author website at www.elizabethzelvin.com. Liz blogs with other mystery authors on Poe’s Deadly Daughters at www.poesdeadlydaughters.blogspot.com and can be found on Facebook and MySpace.

 

 

10 QUESTIONS FOR…Jersey Barnes mystery series author T. Lynn Ocean

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Author interview with T. Lynn Oceanoceanjacket
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1. Tell us about your latest book.

Latest book is SOUTHERN POISON, second in the Jersey Barnes mystery series.  She’s a most unconventional security specialist with a dry wit, a steamy love interest, and a trouble-making poker-playing elderly father.  Next comes SOUTHERN PERIL, which will be released July of this year.

2. How did you get started as a writer?

I’ve always loved to write and began my career by writing articles for a local weekly rag.  I started a freelance writing business about 10 years ago and have written for numerous magazines, newspapers, and private businesses.  But my passion is fiction and my first novel, FOOL ME ONCE, was published summer of 2005 by St. Martin’s Press.

3. What does a typical day look like for you?

Yeah, right!  In my case, I may write for six or eight hours one day, and do nothing on the computer the next day.   I do some volunteer work, have a part time job, and continue to write an occassional feature piece for my local newspaper, THE SUN NEWS.  For me, one of the biggest challenges is finding time to get outside (for enjoyment) and get to the gym (for health).

4. Describe your desk/workspace.

CRAZY MESS!  Laptop, separate large screen monitor, Kinesis ergonimic keyboard, two printers, piles of stuff everywhere, and most importantly–coaster for my tea or coffee.

5. Favorite books (especially for writers)

I love to read books by authors I’ve met at conferences and book festivals.  I also read just about anything that’s currently on the NYT bestseller list because that’s where I aspire to be.

6. Tell us 3 interesting/crazy things about you

I often work in my jammies.  I’m an outdoor enthusiast and enjoy shooting sporting clays.  My favorite type of massage is a good foot rub.

7. Favorite quote

“Happiness is not a station to arrive at, but a manner of travelling” –Margaret Lee Runbeck

8. Best and worst part of being a writer

Best is getting feedback from readers.   I honestly can’t think of anything to list as a ‘worst’.  I love it all, even the frustrating parts.

9. Advice for other writers

Write because you love it.  Surround yourself with positive, supportive, and creative people.

10. Tell us a story about your writing experience.

I once changed clothes sitting in my car at a interstate rest stop on my way to a book signing.  I was running late, it was raining sideways, and I didn’t have time to change at my friend’s house as planned.  I didn’t even have a chance to eat lunch.  Turns out that I forgot my umbrella and got soaked anyway, getting inside the bookstore.  One person showed up, and they’d come to pick up a special order–not to see me!

Where can people buy your books?

Any bookseller can order my books, if they don’t already have them on the shelves.  Also, readers can visit my website at www.tlynnocean.com and click on the ‘Buy Books’ tab to see direct links for the online retailers.

10 QUESTIONS FOR…mystery series author Chester Campbell

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Author interview with Chester Campbellpoisoncoverchesterdcampbell

 

Chester Campbell is the author of two series of mysteries featuring private investigators based in Nashville. He has four Greg McKenzie books, featuring a retired Air Force OSI agent and his wife. They include The Marathon Murders, Deadly Illusions, Designed to Kill, and Secret of the Scroll. The first book in the Sid Chance series, The Surest Poison, will be out in April. In a writing career that has spanned more than sixty years, Campbell has been a journalist, magazine writer and editor, political speechwriter, advertising copywriter, public relations exec, and fiction writer. He lives in a Nashville suburb.

 

1. Tell us about your latest book.

 The Surest Poison deals with a toxic chemical dumped behind a small plant in a rural area near Nashville. When the contamination begins to affect people’s health several years later, PI Sid Chance, former National Parks ranger and small town police chief, is hired to locate the owners of the long-defunct company to get the state off the back of the current occupant. The missing owners don’t want to be found, however, and are willing to murder those who might present a threat. Sid is harassed as his investigation begins to stir the waters. A small house owned by his sidekick, Jaz LeMieux, is destroyed by an explosion, and things turn grim as unsavory people from Sid’s past intervene.

 

2. How did you get started as a writer?

I studied journalism at the end of World War II and started as a newspaper reporter. I wrote my first mystery, which failed to excite any editors, while going to school and working nights at the newspaper. After dabbling at mystery writing over the years, I turned to it fulltime after retirement. I had a 54-year apprenticeship before my first book was published.

 

3. What does a typical day look like for you?

I’m still looking for a typical day. Each one seems a little different and a bit more challenging. At our tender age, my wife and I have taken on raising an eleven-year-old grandson, which frequently throws a kink in my plans. With a new book due out shortly, I’m in the throes of the promotion cycle (even more diifficult than peddling a unicycle). I try to walk two miles a day to keep in shape, but that doesn’t always work out, either. I write on four blog sites, try to do Facebook and Twitter. It gets crazy. I read books in snatches (currently on Jeffrey Deaver’s Garden of Beasts), and I’m working on the plot for a new Greg McKenzie mystery.

 

4. Describe your desk/workspace.

Messy. I have a U-shaped desk that is cluttered with piles of paper. I’m anal about some things, but not my workspace. Traveling around the U from left to right, there’s my PC, scanner, small inkjet printer, answering machine, shelves of CD programs and manuals, laser printer, wide-format inkjet printer, four-tray “in” basket that holds only a fraction of the junk that needs a home. Beyond that is a five-foot table with a large paper cutter and a double row of manuscripts, magazines, and assorted stuff that needs to be thrown away. I hate throwing away things. You never know when they might come in handy.

 

5. Favorite books (especially for writers).

Three of my favorite writing books are Don’t Murder Your Mystery, Chris Roerden’s advice on self-editing; The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Private Investigating, by former FBI agent and veteran Florida PI Steven Kerry Brown; and Forensics for Dummies, Dr. Doug Lyle’s answers to everything you ever wanted to know about forensic investigation.

 

6. Tell us 3 interesting/crazy things about you.

My one-day football career pretty well sums up my luck with sports. We always had a football game going in the backyard when I was a kid. Being small, I dreamed of catching touchdown passes or being a sneaky ball carrier who dashed through holes in the defense. I could run fast, though once I fell on the driveway and chipped my two front teeth into a V-shaped opening. I had lots of dental work done in those days. When I reached high school, I promptly went out for football. The first day of practice in pads, my mouth collided with another boy’s knee. A third front tooth snapped off. Sadly, I turned in my uniform, knowing when I got home my mother would say, “No more football for you.” Which she did. I wound up with a fixed bridge covering four teeth. And no more contact sports.

 

A couple of things about my writing. I don’t let my protagonists smoke. Greg McKenzie is a former smoker, as am I. He kicked the habit in the first book and hasn’t gone back. I’m now allergic to cigarette smoke and can’t stand to be around smokers. I’m always being asked, “Are you Greg?” My stock answer is, “He’s bigger, bolder, and more confrontational. But we think a lot alike.”

 

7. Favorite quote.

Whenever I’d say “I wish” something, my grandmother would say: “If wishes were horses, beggars would ride; if turnips were watches, I’d wear one at my side.”

                               

8. Best and worst part of being a writer.

I’d say he best part is the freedom to express your thoughts and feelings in any manner you choose; the more original your views, the better off you’ll be. For me, the worst part is the knowledge that I can never get everything done I want and need to do regarding my writing and the promotion of books already published. I’m badly in need of a day stretcher.

 

9. Advice for other writers.

My advice is never give up. Perseverance pays. Read voraciously in the genre you wish to write, read some of the great how-to-write books out there, then sit down at the keyboard and write, write, write. The world is full of people who want to write a book. Those who get published are the ones who stay with it till the job is done.

 

10. Tell us a story about your writing experience.  

When I started writing novels in earnest, I finished he first book and began querying agents. I quickly received a go-ahead from one. The young associate handling my manuscript was enthusiastic and began sending it out. But about six months into the process, she wrote that she was leaving the agency and her boss only handled non-fiction. With another book ready by then, I started the search again. This time an older agent took me on. I only heard from him when I called him every two or three months. He would tell me the market was tough. After nearly a year of this, my call was answered by his partner, who advised me that he had died. She was taking no new clients. I had the third book finished and resumed sending queries. This time I got a major New York agency interested. After considerable revision of the manuscript, I received a contract. Again, little contact from New York except when I called. I sent them the next book. By the time a third was ready, a young associate confided that they had let my manuscripts gather dust on the shelves. When the agency head died, a new owner took over and sent out my first book, getting the reaction that it was dated. After three years, duh. . . These days I deal with small presses without an agent.

 

Where can people buy your books?

My fourth Greg McKenzie mystery, The Marathon Murders, can be purchased at any bookstore or online. The new book, The Surest Poison, will be available in early April. Both are published by Night Shadows Press. The first three Greg McKenzie books are out of print but available at my website http://www.chesterdcampbell.com. Opening chapters of all the books can be read there. You can check out my views on writing and things in general at Mystery Mania, my blog at http://chestercampbell.blogspot.com. And all the books are available for the Kindle.

 

 

 

 

 

10 QUESTIONS FOR….murder mystery series author(s) Evelyn David

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murdertakesthecake1Author interview with Evelyn Davidmurderoffthebooks

(a.k.a. Marian Edelman Borden and Rhonda Dosset)

 

 

 

 

 

 


1. Tell us about your latest book.

Murder Takes the Cake is the newest book in the Sullivan Investigations series. It features Mac Sullivan, a retired DC cop and newly-minted private detective; Rachel Brenner, a recently divorced makeup artist in a funeral home; and Whiskey, an adorable and adored Irish wolfhound. It’s the fun sequel to Murder Off the Books.

It’s the week before Thanksgiving and Mac’s goddaughter has just announced her wedding. It’s not long before she discovers that planning a wedding can literally be murder.  Mac, Rachel, and Whiskey have less than a week to find a killer, some missing caskets, and some lost turkeys, as well as maybe a book on modern dating techniques. It’s a fun, festive…and furry adventure guaranteed to leave you laughing out loud and trying to figure out whodunit and why.

2. How did you get started as a writer?

Evelyn David is the pseudonym for Marian Edelman Borden and Rhonda Dossett. Marian lives in New York and is a nonfiction writer with 10 books to her credit. Rhonda lives in Muskogee and is the coal administrator for the state of Oklahoma. They met on an Internet writers’ forum and decided to try and collaborate on some short stories…and then some novels.  We sold a short story to Woman’s World and have been busy writing ever since.

3. What does a typical day look like for you?

Both Marian and Rhonda work their day jobs (nonfiction book writer and coal administrator), while plotting murderous plots during coffee breaks and lunchtime. Most mystery writing is done at night and on the weekends.

4. Describe your desk/workspace.

Messy? A disaster? Looks like a tornado went through and just touched down??

For Rhonda – Not enough storage, too many sticky notes taped everywhere, too many reference books scattered about, too many little temporary tables set up just for a particular project that then grow roots and stay. And a variety of Pepsi One cans and half-empty coffee cups scattered across my desk.  I’d like a fax machine but have absolutely no extra space for one.

For Marian: Ditto, except it’s Diet Coke and teacups.

5. Favorite books (especially for writers)

For Marian, it would be the Miss Marple books by Agatha Christie, and all the Southern Sisters mysteries by Anne George.

For Rhonda, it would be, To Kill A Mockingbird, In Cold Blood, Nevada Barr’s mysteries, Beverly Connor’s Lindsay Chamberlain mystery series, Virginia Lanier’s Bloodhound series, and Margaret Maron’s Deborah Knott mystery series.

6. Tell us 3 interesting/crazy things about you

Probably the craziest thing about Evelyn David is that the two halves have never met. Until we finished the first draft of the first book, we had never even spoken to each other. Now we do talk on the phone, but we are waiting to meet on that very special Oprah or maybe when we win an Emmy for the adaptation of one of our books into a TV movie of the week??

We thrive on deadlines; we wander aimlessly without them.

Neither of us can stand being late for anything. 

7. Favorite quote

“A woman is like a tea bag – you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water.” Eleanor Roosevelt

“It’s easier to get forgiveness, than permission.” Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper

8. Best and worst part of being a writer

The best part about being a writer is creating a new world with characters that resonate with readers. The worst part is the inevitable rejection letters that are like a knife to the heart <sigh>.

The best times are when your characters talk to you and the words flow effortlessly onto the page. Doesn’t happen nearly often enough. The worst part of being an author is the time between writing “The End” and signing copies of your books at a bookstore.

9. Advice for other writers

Hang in there and keep writing. It’s easy to get discouraged because most publishers are reluctant to take a chance on a new writer. But write the book you want, that you would enjoy reading. Don’t worry whether it meets the current “hot” genre. Good writing will eventually be recognized.  Every published author, Stephen King, JK Rowling, Agatha Christie, all have legendary stories about how often they were rejected before they sold their first story. They made it – so can you!

Writing is a craft – study it, practice it, and hone your skills. Good writers continue to study and improve.

Don’t quit your day job.

10. Tell us a story about your writing experience. 

Rhonda’s tale was a learning experience for both halves of Evelyn David.

“My very first booksigning was at a small library near where I work. I was leaving from my office, attending a “Friends of the Library” luncheon where I was the guest speaker. Six weeks ahead of time I’d ordered a box of books from my publisher, just for this event. The box arrived in plenty of time. I didn’t open the box, just stored it with my bookcover posters, easel, bookmarks, etc. On the day of the event, my secretary offered drive me, then stay to pass out bookmarks and handle the change box. (I think she just wanted to see how I handled the role of author instead of government regulator.) Regardless of her motivation, I was very nervous and gladly accepted her help. About twenty minutes before we were to leave, I decided to cut open the box of books there at my office, instead of having to take a knife or scissors with me to the library.  A minute later, I was standing there in the parking lot, knife in hand, looking down into the trunk of my car at the opened box of books. I literally lost my breath. The books in the box were not Evelyn David’s first mystery, Murder Off the Books. My publisher had mistakenly sent me 30 copies of another author’s books. My first thought was, “I haven’t even read this book, how will I talk about it for 30 minutes?” My second thought was not one that can be printed. But everything turned out okay. My secretary went around the office and confiscated all the copies I had previously sold to co-workers. I think I had fourteen copies of Murder Off the Books to take to the library – and most importantly I also had lost my fear of booksignings. The worst had already happened. “

Where can people buy your books?

Please visit Evelyn David at www.evelyndavid.com, and catch her at The Stiletto Gang: Women writers on a mission to bring mysteries, humor and high heels to the world (www.thestilettogang.blogspot.com). Murder Off the Books is available at Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com, as well as directly from Echelon Press (www.echelonpress.com). Murder Takes the Cake will be published in May and available at all those outlets.